Program Timeline

How does an LGO student, within two years, fit in an MBA, a master’s of engineering, and still have time to take leadership roles on and off campus? Because we’ve set them up for success from the beginning. Below is a sample curriculum for an LGO student. We’ve tried to provide links to other areas of the program that are important to the experience, too. Although individual course schedules may vary — MIT is by nature a flexible place to study — we’d like to give you an idea of what the dual degree experience is like and how rewarding it can be.

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LGO students come to MIT three months before their Sloan MBA colleagues. The early coursework allows the LGOs to graduate two years later with two degrees: MBA and an engineering master's degree. But the summer program isn't just about classes. Students start their leadership development curriculum and begin their plant treks. During the summer, LGOs are in classes together, creating a "small school feel." Starting in the fall semester, they integrate into the MIT MBA class and their engineering department, creating a "large school network."

LGO leadership development occurs continuously throughout your two years. Leadership training starts with The Universe Within and continues throughout the summer in the special leadership class. This includes learning about different leadership styles, ethics in leadership and focuses on leadership in your summer teams. It also includes an opportunity for students to start assessing their own leadership style and focusing on areas they want to improve. 

The title of this class refers to the professor's theory that certain organizations have been able to outpace their competitors by continuously learning and improving their business process.  The course focuses heavily on Lean and Six Sigma principles and practices, in involves dynamic systems analysis and analytics tools.

The course consists of a simulated game, whereby each summer group forms a team within a "factory." In this case, each factory is simply a table, with each student assigned different roles such as designer, technician, quality control engineer, etc. The goal of each factory is to produce as many finished products (Lego airplanes) as possible according to "customer demand." The class helps students learn some basic principles of lean and six sigma through a hands-on experience.

This class is an introduction to problems and analysis related to manufacturing and service operations. This includes materials management, production planning and scheduling, quality management, supply chain management, and operations strategy. The course covers various theories of Operations Management and the use of these ideas to solve and analyze the business problems found in case studies.

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The course is an introduction to mathematical modeling, linear programming, network flow problems, integer and nonlinear programming, and computer applications for manufacturing processes and systems. The course strikes a balance between theory and practical application. Some familiarity with spreadsheets and MS Excel is recommended before beginning the class.

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The LGO classes on probability and statistics fulfill the mathematics requirements for your engineering degree and the decision statistics requirement for your MBA. First you’ll review basic probability, which provides a foundation for the second half of the summer. Probability is taught by Arni Barnett, a fan favorite among MIT students. The statistics course follows probability and ends with a module on experimental design, in which teams compete to apply analytics techniques to a defined problem. Last year, teams were challenged to develop the best paper helicopter. The course will also cover robust design and data mining, relevant to other analytics classes at MIT and the LGO internship.

LGOs participate in a weekly Global Operations Leadership Seminar. The weekly seminar hosts speakers who present and discuss real operations and manufacturing challenges happening in their companies and industries. Speakers range from the CEO Consumer Services from Amazon, Jeff Wilke, to the former president of Mexico.

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Led by LGO lecturers, this course discusses specific ethics challenges faced by top management in operations, manufacturing, and high-tech industries. Taught in a case study format, top-level guest lectures are common.

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Beginning this semester, LGO students are fully integrated into the MIT Sloan MBA program. Each LGO is put in a core team and "ocean" to complete the one-semester MBA core. At the same time, students begin their engineering course work with one or two classes in their chosen department.

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You'll explore principles of microeconomic analysis applied to managerial decision-making. The course focuses on supply and demand and game theory. You'll cover theories behind the value proposition of goods and services, pricing, competition between firms, and cooperation between and within firms.

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You'll focus on the writing and speaking skills needed to be an effective manager. Many LGOs use this time to polish their presentation and negotiation skills and prepare to transition from an engineer to a strategic manager. During the course, you'll have a lab called Leadership and Personal Effectiveness Coaching.

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This class uses case studies and discussion to explore how large organizations function and how to manage and lead within them. While working on a final team project, you'll look at organizations through design, political, and cultural frameworks.

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This couse serves as many LGOs first introduction to finance and accounting. You'll look at accounting data and discuss how it reflects the business and economic events. The course is a mixture of lectures and case discussions.

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Each student works with their engineering department to design their curriculum. In some departments, this happens with defined "tracks," or specialization course groups that the engineering faculty designed to guide LGOs. In other departments, you're paired with a faculty advisor who helps you pick classes and create your curriculum to attain your academic and career goals.

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MIT's calendar between spring and fall semesters has a one-month break during January. During Independent Activities Period (IAP), students participate in a variety of activities, such as travel to complete projects worked through during the semester, treks, or short courses on campus.

LGOs go on a three-week whirlwind tour through the USA with one goal: to visit as many LGO partner companies as possible. Most of the expenses for this trip are paid for by MIT.

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LION and GOAL teams - LGO-only Action Learning Labs - put students in charge of a strategic project at a host company. During Spring Break and Sloan Innovation Period, students travel to the company to work on-site. MIT pays for most of the travel costs related to Action Learning Lab work.

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Spring semester's leadership seminar continues from the fall, with a variety of speakers visiting campus to talk to the LGO class about the challenges, successes, and failures during their careers.

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In this LGO-only class, students work with alumni and industry leaders to develop case studies and present them in class.

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Students organize an international experience every year, and travel during the spring break and IAP time frame. It is up to the first-year LGO class where to go, and they set and lead the agenda in guidance with LGO staff. Usually, participating students visit four to six companies during their trip.

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The MIT Sloan MBA program emphasizes a flexible curriculum. Students are encouraged to take one to four electives that best fit their interests and development goals. We've listed a few popular MBA courses for previous LGO classes below.

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LGOs are asked to take one product design course toward their engineering master's degree. We've listed some of the more popular product design courses at the link below, which range from Space Systems Engineering to an integrated design course offered jointly with the Rhode Island School of Design.

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Each LGO student choosing engineering coursework based on their interests and career goals, in consultation with their engineering department.

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LGOs spend six months off campus to work on the LGO internship: a research fellowship at an LGO partner company that combines rigorous graduate level engineering and business applications.

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LGO students are asked to take this course as a capstone to the program. A continuation of the operations coursework done over the first summer, Ops Strategy goes into greater detail and discusses how to manage operations from a strategic, company-wide perspective.

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This seminar-style course is the capstone to the LGO leadership curriculum. Students reflect on their experiences over the two years, and close their experience ready for the next career step.

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Using data gathered during their internship, LGO students write a master's thesis that incorporates engineering and management content. To help guide the research process, LGOs are paired with one MIT Sloan professor and one professor from your department in the School of Engineering.

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LION and GOAL teams take LGO student teams all over the world for their consulting projects. Operations Lab combines MBA and LGO students and sources projects from the Boston and Northeast region. This allows students to regularly visit their host companies, making sure that their studies and suggestions have maximum impact. In the past, Ops Lab companies have ranged from multinational pharmaceutical firms to new MIT startups.

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In their last semester, LGOs finish any needed courses to finish their MBA degree.

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In their last semester, LGOs take any needed courses to finish their SM in engineering degree.

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