FAQ

  • What is LGO?
    • MIT Leaders for Global Operations is a 24-month dual degree MS/MBA program between MIT’s School of Engineering and Sloan School of Management. We work with 20+ industry partner companies to provide research internships, fellowships and recruit graduates into high-tech roles. Our graduates have the technical, analytical, and business skills needed to lead strategic initiatives bridging business with technology to solve global problems. We partner with eight departments to offer our students a broad range of engineering research areas.
  • Do LGOs only focus on studying operations or manufacturing?
    • No, LGOs study a broad array of areas bringing together business and technology. Historically, LGO was founded to revitalize manufacturing but has since grown to be a much more encompassing program. Operations is a featured part of the coursework as it is an underlying foundation to problem solving within industry. Many of our students focus on a specific area of operations such as supply chain, analytics, manufacturing, sustainability, robotics, etc. but each student defines their own interests and approach to their leadership and career goals. 80% of recent graduates found jobs through LGO/Sloan resources.
  • What are some examples of jobs LGOs pursue after graduating?
    • Some job titles for recent LGO graduates have been: Supply Chain and Logistics Manager, Business Operations Manager, COO/Founder, Director of Product Development, Consultant, Senior Manager of Operations Analytics, Program Manager of Cloud Infrastructure, Manager of Digital Transformation, Product Manager, Manager of Industrial Channels, Sr. Operations Engineer.
  • What is the best way to learn more about the program?
  • What is the duration of the LGO Program, and when does it start?
    • The program is a full 24 months and begins in early June each year.
  • How do I choose a department?
    • We partner with eight different departments to offer a wide array of engineering specializations and research areas. Each department has different admissions review processes, requirements, and academic background expectations,, so reviewing the department pages on our website can give insight into what individual departments are looking for in candidates. Our partner departments are: 
    • Some departments, like Biological Engineering or the Operations Research Center, are looking for specific backgrounds and coursework, but most of our departments are more flexible and interested in diverse STEM backgrounds.  Many of our students use the dual degree to pivot into a new field of study. While specializations like sustainability, robotics, manufacturing, and analytics can be studied in several of these departments, it helps to look into classes you want to take and faculty you want to work with to better understand where your particular interests lay. Reviewing past internship projects and seeing what departments students were in can also shed light on what kind of research you can do in each subject area.
  • How is the curriculum structured?
    • The program begins in June each year and the first three months are the LGO Summer Core, a mix of foundational engineering, management, and leadership coursework. In the fall, LGOs are fully integrated into Sloan’s MBA Core. The six month internship starts in either February or June of the first year. The remaining two semesters on campus are spent completing a mix of business electives and engineering courses depending on the individual student’s engineering department and interests. The Master’s thesis is based on research conducted during the internship at one of our partner companies, and completed in the second year. You can see an example of the curriculum layout on our Program Timeline.
  • How is the management and engineering coursework balanced?
    • LGOs take a mix of business and engineering courses throughout their two years. Each engineering department has different requirements, and each student’s course plan is guided by the LGO program office and an engineering advisor. While LGOs have many requirements, course selection is flexible and largely based on individual goals and interests. LGOs take 8-12 management classes and 5-6 engineering classes. Engineering courses tend to be heavier investments in terms of time spent on work outside of class and in class units.
  • How many students do you enroll each year?
    • Each LGO cohort consists of 45-50 students.
  • What is the current class profile of LGO students?
    • The current LGO classes come from a variety of places, industries, and backgrounds. You can learn more about our students from the Meet our Students and Class Profile pages.
  • How do LGO students get involved in the MIT community?
    • All of the career resources, clubs and extracurricular opportunities available at Sloan, and the School of Engineering, as well as the greater MIT community are available to LGO students. This includes the option to obtain roles as Teaching Assistants/Research Assistants, participate in case competitions and conferences, and explore opportunities at the Martin Center for Entrepreneurship, MIT delta v, MIT Sandbox, The Engine, etc.
  • What kind of resources are there for LGO Significant Others (SOs) or LGO students with families?
  • Should I apply to the LGO Program? How can I determine if I am qualified for the program?
    • We look for candidates with a STEM degree and approximately 2 to 10 years of full-time work experience. Candidates best suited for the program have high leadership potential, strong technical problem solving skills, and a curiosity to solve problems at the intersection of business and technology. MIT is a collaborative and innovative environment, where students who want to take a hands-on approach to learning will thrive.
  • What undergrad degrees would make me admissible to LGO?
    • Any STEM designated degree would make a candidate admissible to LGO.
  • Can bootcamp certifications fulfill the STEM degree requirement? 
    • No, LGO requires a prior STEM degree and does not accept bootcamp credit as a replacement.
  • How many years of work experience is required for LGO?
    • Having a successful career track is an important part of your application to the program. On average, students work about 5 years before coming to LGO, however candidates with at least one year and up to ten years of full-time work experience are eligible. We rarely accept students with less than two years of post-graduate experience, as applicants with some industry experience tend to be more competitive. If you are currently in undergrad, you might also be interested in the Sloan MBA Early Admissions program. Undergraduate seniors can apply for early admission and deferral to the Sloan MBA program, and then work for 2 to 5 years before matriculating. If accepted for Sloan early admission, you can then apply for LGO the fall before you matriculate. If you have more than 10 years of work experience, we would recommend that you look into the MIT Sloan Fellows MBA program.
  • Does graduate education and/or assistantships count as full-time work experience?
    • While graduate education and research experience can strengthen an application and can offer a valuable and diverse perspective, it is not considered full-time work experience.
  • How do I apply to the LGO Program?
    • To apply to LGO, you can apply either through the Sloan School of Management or the School of Engineering through the department for which you are applying. You can learn more about the process on our Application Directions page.
  • How are re-applicants regarded in the admissions process?
    • Re-applicants tend to do well in the admissions process, as they can reflect on ways to further strengthen their last application. There is also a section of the application that asks, if you are a re-applicant, what has changed. This is typically a few sentences or a paragraph highlighting any achievements or areas of growth from the previous year. While we cannot give specific feedback on past applications, we are happy to answer any specific questions you have as a re-applicant, and we take a candidate’s continued commitment to LGO very seriously. 
  • Am I eligible if I already have an MS in Engineering?
    • Yes. Many of our students hold a prior MS in Engineering before attending LGO. They are often highly technical professionals looking to pivot into a new field of engineering research. As long as the applicant is not applying for a MS degree in the engineering subject they already have an MS degree in, they are considered admissible to LGO.
  • Does it matter which round I apply in?
    • There is no significant difference between applying in Round 1 vs. Round 2. You should apply when you feel your application will be the strongest.
  • Do I need to submit two applications, one to Sloan and one to the School of Engineering?
    • No, LGO applicants submit ONE application. Students can apply EITHER through the MIT Sloan School of Management (Round 1 or Round 2) OR the MIT School of Engineering (Round 2 only).
  • What is the difference between applying through Sloan vs applying through an engineering department?
    •  The difference between applying through Sloan vs applying through the engineering department depends on which degree you would like to be your primary degree. If you apply through Sloan but are not accepted by LGO, you will still be considered for admission to Sloan’s MBA program. If you apply through an engineering department, you will be considered for admission to the MS if you are not accepted into LGO. The Operations Research Center, Chemical Engineering, Nuclear Science and Engineering, and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science departments only offer applications for LGO through Sloan.
  • Are people who graduated from MIT at an advantage or disadvantage for admission?
    • While MIT graduates receive the same LGO application review process as any other candidate, graduates from MIT who are interested in LGO are often great candidates because they are familiar with the experiential and innovative learning culture at MIT. 
  • Can taking prerequisite courses increase my chances of admission?
    • Each engineering department varies, however some do allow candidates to complete coursework to further strengthen their application. Please contact LGO admissions at lgo@mit.edu to learn more.
  • When are applications due?
    • Applications for the 2020/21 admissions cycle are due on October 1st, 2020 for Round 1 and December 1st, 2020 for Round 2.
  • How will I be notified of my admissions decision?
    • You will receive an email notifying you of a decision letter released within the application portal.
  • Is an interview a required component of the application process?
    • Yes, interviews will be scheduled by invitation only, after an initial evaluation of a complete application. We only interview a select number of candidates who apply, receiving an invitation to interview does not guarantee admission to the program.
  • I have multiple bachelor’s or master’s degrees. Which GPA is considered?
    • Both GPAs are considered along with the coursework taken.
  • What if my school’s grading system is not on a 4.0 scale? How does the Admissions Committee review international coursework? Should I have my grades converted to the U.S. equivalency?
    • You can submit your GPA as is. Please do NOT convert your grades from your previous studies into percentages or other grading scales. We work with applications from all over the world, and review transcripts with a variety of grading scales.
  • Do you accept transfer credits or grant course waivers?
    • We do not accept transfer credit or grant course waivers.
  • Can I submit corrections or updates to my application after submitting it?
    • Yes, if you have any updates to your application after submission, you can email those updates to lgo@mit.edu and we will attach the updates to your application.
  • Can I send additional materials to accompany my application?
    • We recommend applicants do not provide any additional material outside what the application lists.
  • Will you consider a GRE/GMAT score if the exam was taken after the deadline date?
    • Yes, if you take a test after submitting your application you can email your updated test scores to lgo@mit.edu and we will add them to your application.
  • What are the requirements for the recommendation letters?
    • If you are applying through the MIT Sloan application, we require two recommendation letters: one professional and one technical. The professional letter should come from someone who is familiar with your work experience, ideally a supervisor. We generally recommend that the technical recommendation come from an academic source, such as an advisor or professor familiar with your technical/analytical skills. However if you think that someone from your professional work experience can speak better to your technical skills, you can ask them.
    • If you are applying through an engineering department via GradApply, you will be asked for three recommendation letters, with at least one professional and one technical. The third can focus on either/both professional or technical skill sets and experience.
  • What is the video statement used for? What is best practice for the video statement?
    • The 60-second video statement is designed to bring more dimension to your application, and share your personality in an interactive way with the admissions committee. In the application, we ask you to introduce yourself to your future classmates, tell us about your past experiences, and explain why MIT Sloan is the best place for you to pursue your degree.  The video does not have to be formal, we just ask that you shoot the video in one take (no editing) and speak directly into the camera. We love watching the video statements, but please remember to be mindful of background noise as we want to see and hear you clearly.
  • What tests are required for admission?
    • Standardized tests, such as the GMAT and GRE, are a component of the application process and play an important role in our holistic evaluation process. However, in view of challenges brought about by the coronavirus pandemic, we will allow candidates for the 2020-21 admission cycle to submit their application without the test and review their submitted material as is and without negative inferences. If admitted, candidates will not be required to take a test. Additionally, applicants are welcome to submit other pieces of evidence, such as expired test scores (GMAT, GRE, EA, TOEFL, IELTS); MITx MicroMasters, CORe, edX, MBAMath, or any other non-degree coursework completed; or certifications earned such as CPA, ACCA, CFA, etc; all of which may assist the Admissions Committee in its evaluation process. We will accept self-reported test scores by the application deadline, and welcome either traditional or online version of exams.

  • Do you require TOEFL or other English language proficiency test scores?
    • No, LGO does not ask for a TOEFL or other English language tests if you apply through MIT Sloan. If you apply through an engineering department, review the department’s specific application process to see what that department requires for admissions.
  • I’ve taken the GRE/GMAT multiple times; which score does the admissions committee consider?
    • If you submit more than one set of test scores, admissions will look at the highest cumulative score.
  • Do you have a minimum score requirement for the GRE or GMAT?
    • No, there are no minimum test scores that would disqualify an applicant, as we read each application holistically. You can see the average scores of our current LGO students on our Class Profile.
  • What if my GRE/GMAT score is lower than your range?
    • We review each application holistically and the test score is only one of many factors we consider when reviewing. Do not be discouraged if your score is below the range or average, as each part of an application is carefully taken into account, and there is not one piece of an application that will make or break an admissions decision.
  • Aside from my academic background and GRE/GMAT, is there another way to demonstrate quantitative proficiency in my application?
    • Another component of your application that can demonstrate quantitative skills is the technical recommendation which should address your approach to problem solving through analytical and technical mindset. 
  • How much does the LGO Program cost?
    • Tuition for the full two-year program is the same as MIT Sloan’s MBA price. Before financial aid, tuition is currently estimated to be approximately $155K for the full two-year program. You can learn more about the costs of the MIT LGO program on our Financial Aid and Costs page.
  • What types of scholarships and financial aid are available for the LGO program?
    • With the generous support of our partner companies and alumni, the LGO program awards over $3.5 million in fellowships and scholarships to each incoming class. All admitted students who are not fully funded by an outside source are awarded a generous fellowship and considered for additional scholarship funds. On average, the LGO Fellowship covers at least half of total tuition for the two years. The fellowship is distributed throughout the two-year program, and is applied toward the program’s tuition costs or as a stipend. LGO communicates the total financial aid package together with the acceptance letter.
  • Is financial aid available to non-U.S. citizens?
    • Students typically finance their education through fellowship/scholarships, savings, loans, government employer sponsor or some combination of these. The LGO Fellowship is granted to all admitted LGO students and international students can additionally qualify for private loans. The Office of Graduate Education (OGE) also offers excellent resources for additional fellowships and scholarships that are sponsored by organizations outside of MIT LGO and Sloan.
  • When should I apply for financial aid?
  • Can I pursue Teaching Assistant-ships and Research Assistant-ships while at LGO?
    • Unlike a regular MIT engineering graduate student, LGOs are not primarily funded through department assistant-ships, but students can be a TA if they are interested in the experience and want to work more closely with a faculty member in either Sloan or the School of Engineering. TA-ships are more common than RA-ships due to the time constraints of a dual degree. Around 1/3 of LGOs become a TA during their two years at MIT.
    • Compensation depends on the nature of the TA-ship and the amount of time you are committing to the course. ​​ A 100% appointment roughly equates to an average of 20 hours/week and you cannot pursue a TA position until after your Core semester.